England’s counties of Devon and Cornwall

Posted: December 27, 2009 in Travel

On Boxing Day mum and I continued our trip through the English countryside, namely the counties of Devon, and Cornwall.  First stop was Clovelly

Clovelly is nestled amongst the trees on a Cornish cliff-face overlooking the Bristol Channel.  It has a population of a little over 1500 people, plus a few donkeys.  Due to the steep cobblestone slopes and limited vehicle access, deliveries are often made by lowering sledges from the upper carpark.

The secluded village located in North Devon used to be a fishing village in the early 1900’s, however it is now more of a tourist attraction.  Containing only a pub, coffee shop and post-office, the village has an overall feeling of detachment from the rest of the world (in a good way).  After writing that I realised I said post-office and detachment from the world in the same sentence…….. I knew what I meant though.

Clovelly

Clovelly

Decided to spend the night at Newquay as it is only 200 kms away from Clovelly.  Sources told me that it’s a city popular for surfing, sandy beaches, its night-life, and end of year exam parties and stag nights.  Sounds exactly like Brighton, minus the sandy beaches…. and surfing.

Had the best fish and chips thus far in England, perhaps ever.  At breakfast the next morning what was behind window in the dining room was revealed. Cliffs and the entrance to the sea, a stunning view.  No surfers, drunks, or grooms tied to trees in sight.

Newquay

Newquay

We got on the road for another day of driving.  First stop was Tintagel, the alleged birthplace of King Arthur.  Saw the remains of Tintagel Castle, got in the car and left as it was freezing.

Tintagel

Tintagel

The next stop was Boscastle, a small fishing village with a population of less than 1000.  Boscastle harbour is a natural inlet, which is quite spectacular as the water comes right up to the buildings of the village.  A result of this unique harbour design was the 2004 floods, which left 94 residents stranded on the roofs of their houses until rescue was provided by the Royal Air Force, and the Coastguard.

My sudden change in attitude towards English cuisine continued as I sank my teeth into a Cornish Pasty for lunch, in a cafe next to the Boscastle Witchcraft Museum… yum.

Boscastle

Boscastle

Boscastle

Boscastle

We left Boscastle and drove to Launceston, the illusive historical capital of Cornwall.  Reasons for driving here should be obvious to most people reading this.

The road to Launceston

Arriving in Launceston however it was evident that there was a lot more class to this town than its Tasmanian counterpart.  Launceston has a castle, a ‘Bavarian style’ town hall, rolling hills, and a maze like ‘blocky route’ through the historical centre.  With a population of only 8000, its not going be the first returned result for a Launceston search on Wikipedia anytime soon,  however it is a much more relaxed and picturesque Launceston,and definitely a welcoming surprise.

Launceston Town Hall

Launceston Town Hall

Launceston Castle

View from Launceston Castle

Next we drove through Plymouth, which was useless.  A massive city, with uninspiring modern architecture, and slow moving traffic.  Then onto Glastonbury to see the Abbey…. which was closed.

Glastonbury Abbey

Returned to Sherbourne for another night at the Eastbury, and another meal at The Half-Moon, before getting on the train the next day for the trip back to Brighton.

Yes it’s true, a drive through the English countryside is more relaxing than a drive through a random part of Australia.

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